Radio

Jumping monkey

A 10-minute radio piece produced as part of the MA Radio Journalism curriculum. It is a sound-rich edition of a long interview with researchers Renata Meirelles and David Reeks. Half the story is told by the couple in linear narrative form and the other half unfolds via the colorful recordings of children playing in the Amazon.

War reporting

A 5-minute radio piece about war reporting in which two top war correspondents opened their hearts about the thrills, the glamour and the psychology of reporting in a war environment. I must thank BBC Middle East editor Jeremy Bowen and Frontline Club founder Vaughan Smith for their collaboration to this project – also produced during the MA Radio Journalism at Goldsmiths College, University of London.

All too slow for scientists

A news piece producecd for Free Speech Radio News and the Climate Change Media Partinership during the 14 UN Climate Conference in Poznan, Poland. IPCC scientists urged world leaders to  adopt tougher reduction targets and accuses them of not understanding the severity of the situation.

Indigenoug peoples feel left out

A radio feature produced for Free Speech Radio News and the Climate Change Media Partinership during the 14 UN Climate Conference in Poznan, Poland. Indigenous movements demand the creation of an Expert Group on Indigenous Peoples within the UN climate forum to ensure that their rights are taken into account in the climate change debates.

Saint Agnes rasta colony forever changed

A news piece for Free Speech Radio News about the melancholic closure of the case against the St Agnes Rastafari Centre. One year after the longest-living Rastafari centre in Europe had been demolished amid accusations that it had become a crack den, all the Rastas accused were acquitted, and the trial had collapsed  in confusion. A story largely unnoticed by the UK media.

Tibetans in India Speak Out Against Chinese Detentions

I produced this radio feature in Dharamsala, northern India, where the Dalai Lama is based. The town is home to thousands of Tibetan refugees, and another 2,000 arrive every year after crossing the frozen paths of the Himalayas in search of a better life away from the Chinese rule. Many of them are children, like the 16-year-old boy interviewed, who developed a bad case of frost bite after crossing the mountains with his younger brother.

Advertisements

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: